By JON HAWORTH, ABC News

(NEW YORK) — The novel coronavirus pandemic has now killed more than 600,000 people worldwide.

Over 14.5 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.

The United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 3.8 million diagnosed cases and at least 140,957 deaths.

Here is how the news is developing Tuesday. All times Eastern:

4:43 a.m.: Russia’s first COVID-19 vaccine ready, deputy defense minister says

Russia’s first vaccine against the novel coronavirus infection, which was created by military specialists and scientists of the Gamaleya National Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology, is ready, First Deputy Defense Minister Ruslan Tsalikov told Argumenty i Fakty.

“Final assessments on the results of testing by our specialists and scientists of the National Research Center have been already made. At the moment of release all volunteers without exception developed immunity against the coronavirus and felt normal. So, the first domestic vaccine against the novel coronavirus infection is ready,” Tsalikov told the newspaper.

2:43 a.m.: Ft. Worth federal women’s prison announces third COVID-related death

The U.S. Bureau of Prisons announced late Monday a third COVID-related death at FMC Carswell, a specialized federal medical prison for women in Ft. Worth, Texas.

Teresa Ely, 51, tested positive for COVID-19 on June 30 and was transported to a local hospital where she received treatment until she died Monday, July 20.

The BOP announcement said Ely had “long-term, pre-existing medical conditions, which the CDC lists as risk factors for developing more severe COVID-19 disease.”

“Ms. Ely was a 51-year-old female who was sentenced in the Western District of Virginia to a 252-month sentence for Engaging in a Criminal Enterprise and Continuing a Criminal Enterprise,” read a statement from the prison. “Ms. Ely had been in custody at FMC Carswell since September 19, 2007.”

1:37 a.m.: NFL players will be tested daily for COVID-19 for at least the first two weeks of training camp

The NFL announced that players will be tested daily for the coronavirus for at least the first two weeks of training camp.

The league also made an offer to the NFL Players Association to play no preseason games this summer, a source told ESPN’s Adam Schefter.

The players had been pushing to not play preseason games this year, and the league had been seeking to play two games instead of the usual four.

The league’s proposal to the players includes an offer for a longer training camp acclimation period, a source told ESPN’s Dan Graziano, and that is closer to what the union proposed.

The NFLPA has not yet informed the league whether it will accept the proposal.

12:45 a.m.: Church-related COVID-19 outbreaks continue to pop up in West Virginia

During Monday’s briefing, West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice announced that several new church-related outbreaks of COVID-19 have been identified at places of worship in Grant, Logan and Wood counties.

Last week, the governor announced that additional church-related outbreaks had already been identified in Boone, Kanawha, Raleigh and Taylor counties.

Between all seven of these counties combined, these outbreaks account for about 75 total cases.

“We’ve absolutely got to stay on top of this with all in us,” Gov. Justice said. “Please know that the church setting is the ideal setting to spread this virus.”

The governor urged all West Virginians in church settings to follow the state’s safety guidelines, including using every other pew, maintaining social distancing, and wearing face coverings.

“I know these things are really difficult to do,” Gov. Justice said. “But, for right now, they have to be done because, if we don’t, all we’re going to do is lose more people.”

“We could very well lose a lot of our grandmothers and grandfathers – people who have so much wisdom to still continue to pass on – we absolutely don’t need to be losing these great West Virginians,” he said.

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