By LIBBY CATHEY and MICHELLE STODDART, ABC News

(WASHINGTON) — Former President Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial is taking place in the Senate. He faces a single charge of incitement of insurrection over his actions leading up to the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Here is how events are unfolding Thursday. All times Eastern:

Feb 11, 1:27 pm
Lieu says Trump doesn’t show remorse, only shows ‘defiance’

Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., asserted that Trump failed to show remorse for how his behavior incited the riots. Lieu cited Trump’s failure pay his respects to U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick who died during the assault on the Capitol.

Rep. Lieu: "A violent mob murdered a police officer. It took Pres. Trump three days before he lowered the flag."

"And Pres. Trump, who was commander-in-chief at the time, did not attend and pay respects to the officer who lay in state in the very building he died defending." pic.twitter.com/WRYUE8pngH

— ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) February 11, 2021

“President Trump not only failed to show remorse or take accountability, he made clear he is just beginning. For days, he did not address the nation after this attack. We needed our commander-in-chief to lead, to unite a grieving country, to comfort us. But what did President Trump do?,” Lieu said. “Nothing, silence.”

Lieu says that enhanced protection around the Capitol is necessary because Trump has not admitted that he lost the election. Lieu argued that his lack of remorse is important as Trump will ‘undoubtedly’ cause future harm.

“He does not say the one sentence that would stop future political violence, ‘the election was not stolen.’ He still hasn’t said that sentence” Lieu said. “That is why National Guard troops in full body armor still patrol outside.”

Feb 11, 1:22 pm
Raskin: ‘If we don’t draw the line here, what’s next?’

Lead House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin suggested the senators do what Thomas Paine told us to do, “use our common sense.”

“Trump knew exactly what he was doing in inciting the Jan. 6 mob. Exactly. He had just seen how easily his words and actions inspired violence in Michigan. He sent a clear message to his supporters. He encouraged planning and conspiracy to take over capitol buildings and threaten public officials who refuse to bow down to his political will,” Raskin said. “Is there any chance Donald Trump was surprised by the result of his own incitement? Let’s do what Thomas Paine told us to do, use our common sense. The sense we have in common — as citizens. If we don’t draw the line here, what’s next? What makes you think the nightmare with Donald Trump and lawmaking and violent mob is over?”

House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin: "If we don't draw the line here, what's next? What makes you think the nightmare with Donald Trump and his…violent mobs is over?"https://t.co/7IQmTdmVgt #impeachmenttrial pic.twitter.com/AkX1IY74Yu

— ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) February 11, 2021

“January 6th was not some unexpected, radical break from his normal law-abiding and peaceful disposition. This was his state of mind. This was his essential M.O.,” he said.

Feb 11, 1:06 pm
Raskin said siege of Michigan capitol was a ‘dress rehearsal’ for Jan. 6

Lead House manager Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., cited the plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer as an earlier example of inciting his base.

Raskin asserted that the protest at the Michigan state capitol was a “dress rehearsal” for the Jan 6 riot.

“The siege of the Michigan State House was effectively a state-level dress rehearsal for the siege of the U.S. Capitol that Trump incited on January 6th,” Raskin said. “It was a preview of the coming insurrection.”

Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif. began speaking after Raskin about Trump’s lack of remorse.

Feb 11, 12:57 pm
DeGette cites analysis that found ‘civil war’ mentions quadrupled on Parler

House impeachment manager Rep. Diana DeGette cited an analysis that found mentions of “civil war” quadrupled on Parler in the hour after Donald Trump said “show strength.”

House impeachment manager Rep. Diana DeGette cites an analysis that found mentions of 'civil war' "quadrupled on Parler in the hour after Donald Trump said 'show strength.'" https://t.co/7IQmTdmVgt #impeachmenttrial pic.twitter.com/tNASAp6Ohy

— ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) February 11, 2021

“We also have another perspective from this moment: online extremist chatter. At the same time as the people in the crowd shouted, ‘Take the Capitol building,’ as President Trump said, ‘show strength,’ a person posted to Parler saying, ‘time to fight, civil war is upon us,"” Degette said. “Another user said, ‘we’re going to have the civil war. Get ready."” An analysis found members of civil war crime quadrupled on Parler in the hour after Donald Trump said, ‘show strength.’ When insurrectionists got to the Capitol, they continued those rally cries.”

Feb 11, 12:48 pm
Rioter left threatening note for Pence: ‘Justice is coming’

House impeachment manager Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., also disclosed that one notable protester, Jacob Anthony Angeli Chansley, who stormed the Capitol while donning face paint, no shirt and a furry hat with horns, left a threatening note to Vice President Mike Pence.

“Chansley left a threatening note for Vice President Pence right there on the Senate dais. It read, quote, ‘it’s only a matter of time. Justice is coming,"” DeGette said.

Managers on Wednesday used never-before-seen Capitol security footage to show Pence and his family fleeing the Senate chamber at 2:26 p.m. on Jan. 6. Trump, meanwhile at the White House, posted an attack on Pence to Twitter just two minutes earlier at 2:24 p.m.

They also presented video of Chansley telling a reporter it was time to go home from the Capitol only once Trump put out a pre-recorded video asking them to — over three-and-a-half hours after the attack began.

“Have you noticed throughout this presentation the uncanny similarity over and over and over again of what all these people are saying?” DeGette asked the chamber. “They said what Donald Trump said, and that echoed each other. ‘Stand back and standby.’ ‘Stop the steal.’ ‘Fight like hell.’ ‘Trump sent us.’ ‘We are listening to Trump."”

House impeachment manager Rep. Diana DeGette: "All of these people who have been arrested and charged, they're being held accountable for their actions. Their leader, the man who incited them, must be held accountable as well." https://t.co/BY7pGN4vv8 pic.twitter.com/WijFv4P6eB

— ABC News (@ABC) February 11, 2021

Feb 11, 12:46 pm
Raskin says Jan. 6 riots were ‘culmination’ of Trump’s incitement of violence

Lead House manager, Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., said that the violent riot on Jan. 6 was a “culmination” of incitement to violence from Trump. He played a series of video clips from over several years, which Raskin said showed Trump urging violence.

Rep. Jamie Raskin: "January 6 was culmination of the president's actions…The insurrection was the most violent and dangerous episode so far in Donald Trump's continuing pattern and practice of inciting violence. But I emphasize—so far." https://t.co/7IQmTdmVgt #impeachmenttrial pic.twitter.com/uZ76mUh4CL

— ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) February 11, 2021

“This pro-Trump insurrection did not spring into life out of thin air. We saw how Trump spent months cultivating America’s most dangerous extremist groups,” Raskin said. “We saw how he riled them up with corrosive lies and violent rhetoric, so much so that they were ready and eager for their most dangerous mission, invalidating the will of the people to keep Donald Trump in office.”

Raskin cited the increase in hate groups and heightened threat from domestic terror, saying that Trump incited the anger of these groups for “his own political gain.” The House managers also played footage from the Charlottesville, Virginia, “Unite the Right” rally which led to the death of one woman.

“These tactics were road tested. January 6th was a culmination of the president’s actions, not an aberration from them,” Raskin said. “The insurrection was the most violent and dangerous episode so far in Donald Trump’s continuing pattern and practice of inciting violence — but I emphasize ‘so far."”

Feb 11, 12:30 pm
DeGette argues rioters believed they were ‘invited by the president’

House impeachment manager Rep. Diana DeGette continued to lay out the case against Trump on Thursday and argued how the insurrectionists themselves believed that they were following the president’s marching orders.

“They truly believed that the whole intrusion was at the president’s orders — and we know that because they said so,” DeGette said. “Many of them actually posed for pictures, bragging about it on social media, and they tagged Mr. Trump in tweets. Folks, this was not a hidden crime. The president told them to be there, and so they actually believed they would face no punishment.”

"Their own statements before, during and after the attack make clear, the attack was done for Donald Trump, at his instructions and to fulfill his wishes," House impeachment manager Rep. Diana DeGette says about Capitol rioters. https://t.co/BY7pGN4vv8 pic.twitter.com/zOfmN4tNEJ

— ABC News (@ABC) February 11, 2021

Her main message is that rioters were there, solely, “because the president told them to be.”

“The crowd at Donald Trump’s speech echoed and chanted his words, and when people in the crowd followed his direction and marched to the Capitol, they chanted the same words as they breached this building,” she said. “More and more insurrectionists are admitting that they came at Trump’s direction.”

DeGette went on to show news reports and video clips of rioters during and following the Jan. 6 attack saying they believed they were acting lawfully and as Trump had requested.

She said rioters would not have been in Washington had they not been invited by the president to falsely “stop the steal” — and they would not have stormed the Capitol if Trump didn’t embolden them to do so.

House impeachment manager Rep. Diana DeGette shows picture of rioters in the Capitol confronted by SWAT team.

"Looking at these people makes you wonder: who sent them here?…Donald Trump had sent them there." https://t.co/R1qgpe4xET pic.twitter.com/zfP8DUn3to

— ABC News (@ABC) February 11, 2021

Feb 11, 12:24 pm
‘Because President Trump said to’: Over a dozen Capitol rioters say they were following Trump’s guidance

Senate Democrats are focused on trying to tie a direct line between Trump’s rhetoric and the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol by his supporters.

An ABC News investigation into the nearly 200 accused rioters facing federal charges for their alleged involvement at the Capitol — based on court filings, military records, interviews, and available news reports– found that at least 15 individuals who stormed the building have since said that they acted based on Trump’s encouragement, including some of those accused of the most violent and serious crimes.

Trump’s lawyers have defended his comments at the Jan. 6 rally as ones that “fall squarely within the protections of the First Amendment.”

“Mr. Trump, having been elected nationally, was elected to be the voice for his national constituency,” his lawyers  last week.

-ABC News’ Olivia Rubin, Alexander Mallin and Alex Hosenball

Feb 11, 12:15 pm
Plaskett stands out in historic role in Senate trial

Congresswoman Stacey Plaskett’s life journey has taken her from the housing projects in Brooklyn, New York, to a historic role as House impeachment manager in the second Senate trial against Trump.

A delegate from the U.S. Virgin Islands, Plaskett is one of nine Democrats tasked with prosecuting the House’s impeachment case against Trump.

On Wednesday, Plaskett presented new evidence in the impeachment trial — showing previously unreleased videos of the riot at the Capitol on Jan. 6, contending Trump “fanned the flame of violence, and it worked.”

She is also a former law student of lead impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., who was a constitutional law professor at American University. As he introduced her Wednesday afternoon as the first delegate to participate in a Senate trial, Raskin reflected that introducing Plaskett during the Senate trial is “a moment of special pride for me.”

“I hope I’m not violating any records or laws saying she was an A student then and an A+ student now,” Raskin quipped.

JUST IN: House impeachment managers show previously-unseen security footage of Capitol breach.

"The second man through the window is wearing full tactical body armor…Others are carrying riot shields. Among this group are members of the Proud Boys." https://t.co/OKAzzhvIne pic.twitter.com/4WJr4XI6Tt

— ABC News (@ABC) February 10, 2021

Plaskett, who grew up in Brooklyn and a housing community on Saint Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands, also said Wednesday she was a congressional staffer during the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Now a mother of five, Plaskett sheltered in her office during the siege on the Capitol.

-ABC News’ John Parkinson

Feb 11, 12:04 pm
Senate reconvenes for Trump’s second trial

The Senate has reconvened for Trump’s second impeachment trial and will continue to hear arguments from House impeachment managers on Thursday.

Senate Chaplain Barry Black first led the chamber in a prayer. Presiding officer Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., then led the group through the Pledge of Allegiance, followed by the traditional “Hear ye! Hear ye! Hear ye!” proclamation from the sergeant-at-arms.

"Give our Senate jurors discernment that will rescue our nation from ruin."

Senate Chaplain Barry Black leads a prayer at the start the third day of the Trump #impeachmenttrial: https://t.co/32yttmAJ8G pic.twitter.com/TRZS3EWGZB

— ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) February 11, 2021

After brief remarks from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, House managers will continue and conclude their presentation in support of the singular article of impeachment for “incitement of insurrection,” receiving up to 16 hours over two days.

Managers on Wednesday argued that Trump spent months priming supporters to storm the Capitol on Jan. 6, in a last-ditch effort to overturn the election results after failed attempts to compel local, state and federal law enforcement and election officials to do so.

They also used never-before-seen Capitol security footage of senators, House members and former Vice President Mike Pence fleeing the chambers during the riot to transport lawmakers back to that moment when many of them were fearing for their lives.

Trump’s team will then present their defense of the former president. They are also expected to receive up to 16 hours over two days.

-ABC News’ Trish Turner

Feb 11, 11:46 am
House managers to wrap opening arguments

Trump’s second impeachment trial — the first for a former president — resumes Thursday at noon with a second and final day of opening arguments from House impeachment managers who are making their case that Trump incited an insurrection.

House impeachment managers will provide “additional evidence” of Trump’s role in the Capitol riot and his “lack of remorse” on the Senate floor Thursday, aides to the managers’ team said on an earlier background call.

“We definitely have the goods and we’ll be bringing them home today,” one aide told reporters.

Managers on Wednesday argued that Trump spent months priming supporters to storm the Capitol on Jan. 6, in a last-ditch effort to overturn the election results after failed attempts to compel local, state and federal law enforcement and election officials to do so.

They also used never-before-seen Capitol security footage of senators, House members and former Vice President Mike Pence fleeing the chambers during the riot to transport lawmakers back to that moment when many of them were fearing for their lives.

After the first day’s arguments on Tuesday, in an unexpected move, Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., joined Democrats and five other Republicans in voting that the trial is constitutional, changing his vote from an earlier motion on the issue, citing the Democrats’ “compelling argument.”

Democrats would need at least 17 Republicans to side with them in order to convict and potentially bar Trump from running for federal office again, but the majority of Republicans have already signaled they will not vote to convict.

Feb 11, 10:04 am
House managers to provide “additional evidence” of Trump’s role, his “lack of remorse”: Senior aides

Day Three of Trump’s second impeachment trial is scheduled to convene at noon on Thursday for the end of the House managers’ opening arguments.

House managers have used about five hours and 35 minutes of their time; their aides have told ABC News that they don’t intend to use all of their 16 hours of time allotted.

According to senior aides to the House impeachment managers, on the Senate floor Thursday, the managers are expected to provide “additional evidence” of Trump’s role in the riot and his “lack of remorse.”

“The president knew his vice president was in danger and did nothing,” they said.

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